Monthly Archives: July 2013

With football comes fear of concussion

OK, Texas Panhandle football fans. Your favorite time of the year is just about upon you. But let’s be aware of something associated with this rite of autumn. Our cherished young men are going to be banging heads — quite literally — and with that head-banging comes a dreaded fear of concussion. To that end, […]

An icon remembers a national turning point

John Lewis is the last man standing among a group of leaders who stood before the world and called for the right of all people to enjoy the fruits of freedom. He has told his story to Bill Moyers, who also recalls the day when 250,000 people gathered on the Washington Mall to hear the […]

Known only as Hillary

Reporters, be they print or broadcast, usually adhere to strict word-use styles particularly when it involves identifying people in the news. Print media, for instance, will report the person’s first and last name initially, then use just the last name of the individual in any subsequent reference. Broadcast media reporters and commentators are often heard […]

Can a non-Hispanic join Hispanic caucus?

An interesting debate is roiling within the U.S. House of Representatives involving whether a non-Hispanic lawmaker can join the House Hispanic Caucus. Robert “Beto” O’Rourke represents El Paso in the House. His district is 80 percent Hispanic; its voting population is nearly 78 percent Hispanic. O’Rourke, a Democrat, goes by a nickname — Beto — […]

Let’s debate, GOP contenders

Let's debate, GOP contenders.

Crime scene investigators under the glass

So … I was looking through PBS’s website the other day and I came upon this Frontline episode that was broadcast in April 2012 and shown on KACV-TV. It dealt with crime scene investigations. http://video.pbs.org/video/2223977258/ How real are the depictions shown on television, on all those “CSI” programs? Not very, according to the Frontline special. […]

Tuition is target of petition

There once was a time when a public college or university education in Texas was cheap. Dirt cheap. But students got far more for their money than a convenience-store-quality education. It’s no longer dirt cheap to attend college in Texas, where university systems used to rely heavily on oil-revenue royalties to finance their operations. Federal […]